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The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
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Found Records:
London, British Library Cotton Julius B.XII
Number 5983-1
1.   f. 4   To his reign came
Verses on the reign and death of King Harold (acephalous) — last two lines of a rhyme royal stanza plus one complete stanza
Number 3560-2
2.   ff. 10v-11   Most reverend righteous regent of this regality
Address of Welcome to Henry VII at York (1486), presentation of the Keys of the City — four stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3559-2
3.   ff. 11-11v   Most prudent prince of proved prevision
Address of Welcome to Henry VII at York (1486) at Ouse Bridge — in rhyme royal stanzas
Number 1936-1
4.   f. 11v-12   Henry sayeth my Son as thy Sovereign hath th’assembly assigned
Welcome to Henry VII at York in 1486: Speech of the Virgin Mary — one 8-line and one 10-line stanzas
Number 3558-2
5.   ff. 12-12v   Most prepotent prince of power imperial
Address of Welcome to Henry VII at York (1486) at the Common Hall — three stanzas rhyme royal
Number 6200-1
6.   ff. 13v-17   Welcome nephew welcome my cousin dear
Pageant verses to Henry VII in A.D. 1486 at Worcester — twenty-three stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3540-1
7.   ff. 17v-18   Most Christian prince and friend unto the faith
Pageant verses, spoken by St George, St Ethelbert, and the Virgin Mary, to welcome Henry VII in 1486 at Hereford — three stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3543-1
8.   f. 18v   Most dear cousin of England and France
Pageant verses to Henry VII in A.D. 1486 at Bristol — five stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3556-1
9.   f. 19v   Most noble prince our sovereign lord
Pageant verses for Henry VII in A.D. 1486 at Bristol — three stanzas rhyme royal
Number 6198-1
10.   ff. 20-20v   Welcome most excellent high and Victorious
Pageant verses spoken by Iusticia to Henry VII in A.D. 1486 at Bristol — four stanzas rhyme royal
Number 4007-2
11.   f. 59v   O most famous noble king thy fame doth spring and spread
John Skelton[?]. Verses presented to Henry VII (in 1488) by Skelton — five stanzas rhyme royal including refrain, ‘To see thy king so flowring in dignytie’ with burden: ‘England, now rejoysse, for joyous may thou bee / To see thy king so flowring in dignytie’