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The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
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Found Records:
Oxford, New College 314
Linguistic note: McIntosh, Samuels, and Benskin (1986) and Benskin, Laing, Karaiskos, and Williamson (2013) 1.153 (‘Norfolk associations. Norfolk’). But cf. Mosser (2010), where it is suggested the manuscript’s marked spellings point to the Southwest.
Number 6414-14
1.   ff. 2-265v   When that April with his showers soot
Canterbury Tales
Number 6415-13
2.   ff. 2-4v   When that April with his showers soot
Geoffrey Chaucer, the General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales — 858 lines in rhyming couplets
Number 6530-13
3.   ff. 4v-35   Whilom as old stories tellen us
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Knight’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 2249 lines in couplets
Number 6427-13
4.   ff. 35-36   When that the Knight had thus his tale I-told
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Knight-Miller link in the Canterbury Tales — 78 lines in rhyming couplets
Number 6537-13
5.   ff. 36-45   Whilom there was dwelling in Oxenford
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Miller’s Tale in the Canterbury Tales — 666 lines in rhyming couplets
Number 6307-11
6.   ff. 45-45v   When folk had laughen at this nice cas
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Reeve’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 66 lines in couplets.
Number 724-13
7.   ff. 45v-51v   At Trumpington not far fro Cantebridge
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Reeve’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 404 lines in couplets.
Number 5238-10
8.   ff. 51v-52   The Cook of London while the Reve spake
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Cook’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 40 lines in couplets.
Number 145-11
9.   ff. 52-52v   A prentice whilom dwelt in our city
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Cook’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 58 lines in couplets.
Number 4315-13
10.   ff. 52v-54   Our Host saw well that the bright sun
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Introduction to the Man of Law’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 98 lines in couplets.
Number 3929-12
11.   ff. 54-54v   O hateful harm condition of poverty
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Man of Law’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 35 lines (five stanzas) in rhyme royal.
Number 2587-13
12.   ff. 54v-69   In Syria whilom dwelt a company
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Man of Law’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 1026 lines in rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 4316-9
13.   f. 69v   Our Host upon his stirrups stood anon
Geoffrey Chaucer, the ‘Epilogue’ of the Man of Law’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 28 lines in couplets.
Number 725-12
14.   ff. 69v-79v   At Sarai in the land of Tartary
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Squire’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 664 lines in couplets.
Number 6185-4
15.   ff. 79v-80   Weeping and wailing care and other sorrow
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Merchant’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 32 lines in couplets.
Number 6535-11
16.   ff. 80-96v   Whilom there was dwelling in Lombardy
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Merchant’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 1174 lines in couplets.
Number 1242-13
17.   ff. 96v-109   Experience though none auctoritee
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Wife of Bath’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 856 lines in couplets, with some versions including additional lines.
Number 2618-13
18.   ff. 109-115   In the old days of King Arthur
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Wife of Bath’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 408 lines in couplets, with some versions including additional lines.
Number 5802-13
19.   ff. 115-115v   This worthy limiter this noble Friar
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Friar’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 36 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 6536-13
20.   ff. 115v-121   Whilom there was dwelling in my country
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Friar’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 364 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 5756-12
21.   ff. 121-122   This Summoner in his stirrups high stood
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Sommoner’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 44 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 3255-13
22.   ff. 122-130v   Lordings there is in Yorkshire as I guess
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Summoner’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 586 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 4860-13
23.   ff. 130v-131   Sir Clerk of Oxenford our Host said
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Clerk’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales —56 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 5573-13
24.   ff. 131v-148v   There is at the west side of Italy
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Clerk’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales —1155 lines in rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 5801-5
25.   f. 148v   This worthy Clerk when ended was his tale
Geoffrey Chaucer, the ‘Clerk’s Endlink’/‘The Host’s Stanza’ of the Canterbury Tales —one 7-line rhyme royal stanza.
Number 5617-10
26.   ff. 148v-149   These old gentle Bretons in their days
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Franklin’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 20 lines in couplets.
Number 2476-11
27.   ff. 149-161v   In Armorica that called is Brittany
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Franklin’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 896 lines in couplets.
Number 5405-12
28.   ff. 162-163v   The minister and nourice unto vices
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Prologue of the Second Nun’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 119 lines in rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 5729.4-12
29.   ff. 163v-170   This maiden bright Cecilia as her life sayeth
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Second Nun’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 434 lines in rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 6296-10
30.   ff. 170-172   When ended was the life of Saint Cecilia
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Canon’s Yeoman’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 166 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 6753-10
31.   ff. 172-183v   With this chanon I dwelt have seven year
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Canon’s Yeoman’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 762 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 5599-12
32.   ff. 183v-187v   There was as telleth Titus Livius
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Physician’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 286 lines in couplets.
Number 4314-10
33.   ff. 187v-188   Our Host gan to swear as he were wood
Geoffrey Chaucer, the ‘Host’s Words’/‘Physician-Pardoner Link’ of the Canterbury Tales — 42 lines in couplets.
Number 3251-12
34.   ff. 188-190   Lordings quod he in churches when I preach
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Pardoner’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 136 lines in couplets.
Number 2502-12
35.   ff. 190-197v   In Flanders whilom was a company
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Pardoner’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 506 lines in couplets.
Number 120-13
36.   ff. 197v-204   A merchant whilom dwelled at Saint-Denis
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Shipman’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 434 lines in couplets.
Number 6206-13
37.   f. 204   Well said by corpus dominus quod our Host
Geoffrey Chaucer, the ‘Shipman-Prioress Link’ of the Canterbury Tales — 18 lines in couplets.
Number 3970-14
38.   ff. 204v-205   O Lord Our Lord Thy name how marvelous
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Prioress’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 35 lines in 7-line, rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 5601-14
39.   ff. 205-208   There was in Asia in a great city
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Prioress’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 203 lines in 7-line, rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 6401-12
40.   f. 208   When said was all this miracle every man
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Prologue to Sir Thopas in the Canterbury Tales — 21 lines in 7-line, rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 3097-13
41.   ff. 208-211   Listen lords in good entent
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Sir Thopas in the Canterbury Tales — 207 lines in 6-line, tail-rhyme stanzas.
Number 3700-12
42.   ff. 211-211v   No more of this for Gods dignity
Geoffrey Chaucer, the ‘Thopas-Melibee Link’ in the Canterbury Tales — 48 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 6295-9
43.   ff. 237-238v   When ended was my tale of Melibee
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Monk’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 102 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 2316-10
44.   ff. 238v-249   I will bewail in manner of tragedy
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Monk’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 776 lines in eight-line stanzas.
Number 2033-8
45.   ff. 249-249v   Ho quod the Knight good sir no more of this
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Nun’s Priest’s Prologue of The Canterbury Tales — 53 lines in couplets, occurring in two forms, one lacking lines VII.2771-90.
Number 142-11
46.   ff. 249v-259   A poor widow somedeal stoop in age
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Nun’s Priest’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 626 lines in couplets.
Number 6711-11
47.   ff. 259-260v   Wit ye not where there stands a little town
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Manciple’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 104 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 6390-12
48.   ff. 260v-264   When Phoebus dwelled here in this earth adown
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Manciple’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 258 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 941-9
49.   ff. 264-265   By that the Manciple had his tale all ended
Geoffrey Chaucer, the the Parson’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 74 lines in rhyming couplets.